YUI Library-Interview with Nate Koechley, Senior Frontend Developer at Yahoo!

Greetings WOW members and Web professionals everywhere. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute.

Today?’s podcast is a continuation of the media coverage of the Web Design World Conference that took place in Seattle, WA last week.

I had the pleasure to interview Nate Koechley, Senior Frontend Developer at Yahoo! regarding his session, “Enhancing Your Sites with the Yahoo! Interface Library”. Nate has been instrumental in creating and defining the practice of Web development and front- end engineering. Nate has championed modern standards-based Web development, a commitment to accessibility, code and pattern library creation, and open-source and blogging initiatives.

Check out the three minute interview on today?’s WOW Technology Minute website.

About the Yahoo! User Interface Library

The Yahoo! User Interface (YUI) Library is a set of utilities and controls, written in JavaScript, for building richly interactive web applications using techniques such as DOM scripting, DHTML and AJAX. The YUI Library also includes several core CSS resources. All components in the YUI Library have been released as open source under a BSD license and are free for all uses.

Check out the great resources on the Yahoo! User Interface Library website.

Also, check out Nate’s blog for more about Nate and his coverage of the web world.

Todays WOW Technology Minute is sponsored by Adobe Systems and their series of MAX conferences for 2008/2009

MAX is an experience unlike any other — an opportunity to connect with thousands of designers, developers, partners, executives, and Adobe staff for education, inspiration, and community. MAX 2008/2009 will be held in San Francisco, Milan, and Tokyo. Be sure to mark your calendar for this important global event.

Register today on the Adobe Max website!

Transcript:

BILL CULLIFER: Greetings WOW members and Web Professionals everywhere. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute, here at Web Design World Seattle. I have the pleasure to be interviewing Nate Koechley, from Yahoo!. In fact he was one of the first developers at Yahoo and he presented today on enhancing your site with the Yahoo! Interface Library. Great resources Nate. I?’m curious, for the subscribers of this podcast that can?’t participate in this event, can you give a summary of the session and maybe a walk-away with a link or two of where they can go to get more resources?

NATE KOECHLEY: Absolutely. So today we talked about…we started with an hour session with did an overview of “What is YUI?” The Yahoo! User Interface Library, the YUI Library, is a collection of utilities and controls written in JavaScript, CSS and HTML, for bringing interactivity, more power and interactivity, to your page. So we?’ve got a bunch of utilities like DOM manipulation, event handling, a lot of widgets like calendars and sliders, some CSS controls, and a growing collection of development tools for logging and unit-testing and stuff like this.

And so the second half of the session was really about how to enhance your site. One of the things we believe in architecturally is the notion of progressive enhancement and preserving accessibility and these other sort of concerns. So what we talked about was how to take a simple nested UL or OL structure, add YUI to it and immediately transform it into a rich, interactive DHTML-powered menu. How to take a text area and turn it into a rich-text editor, with just a couple of lines of code and work across all the A-grade browsers while preserving accessibility, internationalization, all these other things. So it?’s a big library. It?’s designed to be a-la-carte, you can pick and choose the pieces you want. It?’s very lightweight, it runs on all the Yahoo sites and thousands of other sites around the world. You can download it for free, it?’s under a BSD license at developer.yahoo.com/yui. Our whole team blogs at yuiblog.com. I?’m online at natekoechley.com and love to hear from you all.

BILL: Excellent. I appreciate that. And terrific resources, I know that firsthand. I thank you for all the work that you?’re doing to make all those resources available and for the interview today.

NATE: You?’re very welcome.

BILL: Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters, WOW Technology Minute, here with Nate Koechley, senior engineer, designer at Yahoo. Thank you so much Nate.

NATE: My pleasure, thank you.

Compatibility in the Brave New World and Effective JavaScript Programming-Interview with Joe Marini, Microsoft

Greetings WOW members and Web professionals everywhere. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute.

Today?’s podcast is a continuation of the media coverage of the Web Design World Conference that took place in Seattle, WA last week.

For today?’s podcast, I had the pleasure to interview Joe Marini, Director Development Tools Ecosystem at Microsoft regarding his sessions entitled: “Compatibility in the Brave New World and Effective JavaScript Programming.” Joe?’s a veteran Web professional with extensive experience dating back over 15 years where he served as one of the original team members of the Dreamweaver engineering team at Macromedia. He?’s also a terrific public speaker, an easy going guy and is an author of a best selling book entitled “The Document Object Model” published by McGraw Hill.

Check out the four minute interview on today’s WOW Technology Minute website.

Also, here are a few of my notes from his session, “Compatibility in a Brave New World.”

•A BIG question often asked by Web Pro?’s, is “How do I make my pages and scripts compatible across all browsers and “What about the portable devices?”
•From an historical context, this is not a new problem. In the 80?’s we had several dozen competing personal computer makers, each with its own operating system
•In the 90?’s we experienced consolidation around several major operating systems
•In the years of 2,000S, several dozen competing mobile devices debut with their own versions
•Roll the clock to today and consolidation around several major mobile operating system
•Tomorrow we will experience intelligent device manufactures with their own embedded operating system

In summary, Joe points out the following:

•Compatibility is a subject that spans a lot more than just browsers and versions
•The problem has been around since the dawn of technology and will always be with us
•Standards don?’t solve the problems by themselves
•There are multiple ways to approach the problem across the Web tiers, most are not mutually exclusive
•Understand the audience, the requirements and the trade-offs

Joe?’s list of recommended resources:

•Wikipedia Comparison of JavaScript Frameworks
•Dojo Frameworks: http://dojotoolkit.org
•Yahoo UI: http://developer.yahoo.com/yui
•http://script.aculo.us
•http://wurfl.sourceforge.net/index.php

From his session on Effective JavaScript Programming:

The need for effective JavaScript includes:

•JavaScript has evolved and grown
•From simple interactivity to full-featured language
•The types of scripts written have also flourished
•Now full two-way server connectivity with Ajax, complex interactivity on the screen, full access to page content via the DOM
•With these changes, script developers have more opportunity than ever

Today s podcast is sponsored by the Webmaster Survival Guide. Check out all of the great resources and links on the Webmaster Survival Guide website.

Transcript of Web Compatibility JavaScript Interview Joe Marini

BILL CULLIFER: Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute, here at Web Design World Seattle. I have the pleasure to be interviewing Joe Marini, Director of Development Tools Ecosystems at Microsoft. Joe, good morning and thanks for agreeing to this interview.

JOE MARINI: Oh yes, no problem. Thanks for having me.

BILL: Joe, you presented yesterday and later on today on a couple of topics that I have an extreme interest in. And one is on “Compatibility in the Brave New World.” And then the second one you talked a little bit more in depth, technically, about JavaScript. Can you, for the subscribers of this podcast, give us a summary on the “Compatibility in the Brave New World” and what that session was all about?

JOE: Sure. When you?’re looking at what compatibility means today I think a lot of people have a [phone rings], excuse me one second–

BILL: No, it?’s all good. It?’s Joe, catching a phone live. [laughter] Gotta love it.

JOE: Compatibility today, I think a lot of people misunderstand what it means fundamentally. They go with a preconceived notion, basically, I take a Web page, I run it through a Web server, the Web page comes out the other side, it looks great in all the browsers, right? That?’s what most people, I think, in the Web space describe as compatibility. What they don?’t realize is that compatibility expands in many more dimensions than that, right? What is that Web browser running on? Is it running on a desktop PC or is it running on something like this? Is it running on, in the future smart devices like maybe a car or a refrigerator? On top of that throw in all the Web 2.0 APIs that are being produced. All of these add dimensions to compatibility. And it?’s really more a way of living, it?’s a way of designing your Web applications upfront so that as these changes come along you haven?’t made any preconceived notions about what your content is going to be viewed on, whether it?’s going to be a desktop PC, or mobile device or whatever. That?’s really the message about compatibility, trying to deliver your message. Think ahead so that when new technologies come along, new platforms come along, you plan for that and you can move your content readily to those new platforms.

BILL: Yeah, very good point. I appreciate that. So the second session, the JavaScript session, that you?’re presenting today, can you talk to a little about the intended audience of that and what exactly, at the end of the day, are you trying to accomplish with that session?

JOE: You know, if you look at where JavaScript was ten years ago and you look at where it is today, it?’s almost ninety degrees. Ten years ago how was JavaScript being used? It was being used for roll-over buttons, it was being used for simple form validation. Today you?’ve got AJAX in the mix, right? You?’ve got all these complex interactions going on on screen, drag and drop interfaces and really complex user interfaces. So JavaScript itself has evolved over time to enable more and more powerful experiences on the Web. At the same time though, a lot of people who may have learned JavaScript in the early years didn?’t really have a technical background. They put in snippets of code here and there and they hacked it together to make it work. So what I?’m trying to do with this session today is to really take a step back and illustrate some important concepts you need to know about programming in general, from a designer?’s point of view, about how to get the most performance out of JavaScript, right ways and wrong ways to do things, just general concepts that you need to understand in order to build these more complex applications.

BILL: Yeah, fair enough. And I appreciate this is a Web design centric conference so you?’re presenting technical concepts to some artistic designers that may not…I mean, you obviously see a connection, right, between–

JOE: There?’s going to be people who are very design centric and don?’t do a whole lot of coding. There will be people who do both design and coding. There will be people who are maybe more code centric than design centric. But anyone along that spectrum, at some point, if you?’re going to be doing complex Web design, at some point you?’re going to have to have some kind of interactivity, right? That means doing some type of Java coding. And even if you don?’t do a whole lot of coding, chances are you?’re working with a developer who is. You may have to make some changes to the person?’s code, you may have to read it to see what?’s going on, you may have to make some suggested changes. It?’s important to know what?’s going on under the hood so you can have that intelligent conversation.

BILL: Very well said. I couldn?’t have said that better. Excellent point. Thank you so much for your insight and for your effort here at the conference. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) with the Web Design conference, Web Design World, with Joe Marini. And he?’s from Microsoft and we thank you so much for your time.

JOE: Thank you.

ANNOUNCER: Today?’s minute is sponsored by the Webmaster?’s Survival Guide. When you need professional resources be sure to check out webmastersurvivalguide.com. There?’s something there for all skill levels and disciplines. And be sure to ask about advertising opportunities with this PR6 website from the World Organization of Webmasters.

Web Design for ROI-Interview with Lance Loveday, CEO for Closed Loop Marketing

Greetings WOW members and Web professionals everywhere. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute.

Today?’s podcast is a continuation of the media coverage of the Web Design World Conference in Seattle, WA. I had the pleasure to meet up with and interview Lance Loveday, CEO for Closed Loop Marketing and an author of a great new book entitled: “Web Design for ROI.”

Lance?’s experience in the world of search marketing dates back to 1997 when he worked as a Web site manager for a Fortune 100 company in the Silicon Valley. I also had the pleasure to sit in on the session Web Design for ROI: How Design Impacts Effectiveness. Although the concepts that Lance presented are not new, it amazes me how often many of some of the most obvious and the simplest of concepts are regularly overlooked. In fact, to his credit, Lance did a terrific job of making a great business case for great design and the role of the Web designer as well.

If you?’re in need of some support in getting your management or clients to invest in better design strategies, than I recommend that you turn up your speaker volume and take some notes of today’s WOW Technology Minute website.

Here are a few notes that I took away from his session:

•Broadcast TV advertising is in decline and Internet advertising is on the rise
•Good design has impact on organizational creditability
•Create compelling landing pages and use consistent imagery and messaging
•Also, provide what you promised (language that?’s consistent with your banner ad)
•Fewer more meaningful graphics with a clear call to action and prioritized buttons
•Create single page checkouts
•Emphasize usability and A/B testing

Today?’s WOW Technology Minute is brought to you by WebProtraining.org, offering a complete solution for all your Web professional training needs including WOW certification options. Check it out at Web Professional Training website

Transcript of Web Design for ROI-Interview with Lance Loveday, CEO for Closed Loop Marketing

BILL CULLIFER: Greetings WOW members and Web professionals everywhere. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute, here at Web Design World Seattle. I?’m at the WOW table top with Lance Loveday, the CEO of Closed Loop Marketing from almost my hometown, just down the street, in Northern California. Lance is the CEO of Closed Loop Marketing and also a publisher, or an author rather, of a very, best-selling book Return on Investment, or at least designing for ROI. Right?

LANCE LOVEDAY: WEB DESIGN FOR ROI.

BILL: Yeah, terrific. Thanks Lance. You presented this morning on that topic and I?’d like if you could, please Lance, for the subscribers of this podcast, could you summarize that session for us?

LANCE: Sure, I?’ll do my best to do it in a few minutes. The reason that we wrote the book, and one of the guiding principles of the company I guess, is we think that web design, the way that it?’s practiced by a lot of organizations today, is broken. By that we mean that it?’s often sort of dysfunctional, the way in which the process works. A lot of designers feel like their hands are tied, that their opinions aren?’t listened to…

BILL: Interesting.

LANCE: And that they?’re not able to do their best work in many cases, because they don?’t have a seat at the decision-making table.

BILL: Now why is that, do you think, Lance? You?’re a dot-commer, you?’ve been in this space for a number of years, what has been your findings? Why is there a disconnect?

LANCE: I think it?’s such a young industry.

BILL: Okay.

LANCE: So many of the executives involved have always been able to have their say over creative decisions, that for them that?’s the natural order. So it?’s common for them to be able to overrule the designer and do things their way, based in most cases on their subjective opinion, their likes and dislikes, as opposed to being able to fall back on a more methodical decision-making foundation, for how you go about deciding how to design an effective website.

BILL: Yeah, interesting. I agree with you. We talked earlier about other industries suffering from the same issue, or previous formats for publishing, be it print or billboards. This is not necessarily new to the Web, but it?’s definitely a lot more complex because it has a component of technology design and I suppose to a great degree, business. Right?

LANCE: Exactly, right. And the stakes are higher with the Web, I guess, is my main concern. If you screw up a print ad, or actually if you put out an ad that underperforms relative to its potential, or that isn?’t quite up to snuff design-wise, that?’s a one-time hit that you take and you learn your lesson and move on. But if you instill those dysfunctions into how you go about designing your site, then you?’re doomed to under perform over potentially, a long period of time, with the site. And your competitors, at least in the online space, are going to have the opening to run rings around you. And I?’m seeing it happen a lot.

BILL: I bet. Interesting stuff. And you know, as a professional organization, and I know you as well being a professional in this space for a number of years, metrics is not new, it?’s been around for a number of years. Web metric tools provide resources to be able to do an analysis of this. Do you have a sense that these tools and these resources are being utilized? Are we making any headway in this space? Or do you just see pretty much similar stuff that we?’ve been talking about for a number of years, and that is those resources are under utilized and not really used to its fullest potential?

LANCE: They?’re being utilized, and I think you hit on it, they?’re not being utilized to their full potential. The standard reports you get out of an analytics package for example, is just chock full of data, but to really develop any intelligence you have to dive in pretty deep. So we?’re encouraged by the advent of some of the new tools, Google analytics and some of the other tools that allow you to play around with some more customizable dashboards that draw up the more actionable metrics and give you some better intelligence out of the gate. But my concern is that a lot of organizations are publishing reports, distributing reports, but at the end of the day very few people are reading them and those that do often aren?’t often putting in the time required to do the deeper analysis.

BILL: Fair enough. Well said. I think you?’re right. So do you also believe that perhaps those business units or individuals are asking our technology workforce to be able to provide an analysis of those reports? In other words, there?’s maybe a disconnect between the designer having that level of knowledge and maybe the emphasis has been on asking those individuals to be able to give them the custom reports that they?’re looking for?

LANCE: I think in a lot of cases what we see is that it?’s no one person?’s job–

BILL: Right.

LANCE: …to not only produce the reports, but then conduct the analysis and then take it even a step further and put together an action plan, based on that analysis.

BILL: Yeah, maybe that?’s the point. There either needs to be or you may need to outsource that particular function to somebody that specializes in it. Yeah, very interesting. So today you presented on Designing for ROI. Obviously there is a connection, at least in my professional opinion, between the visual design and the overall success of the website. Can you address that a little bit?

LANCE: Sure. One of the research points that I spoke to is the impact of first impressions, that as a user visiting the site for the first time their impression of the site when they experience it. And there?’s some research that shows that people start to react to a new interface, a new website, in as little as 1/20th of a second. And in that 1/20th of a second there?’s not much time for them to, well there?’s not any time for them to read anything. All they can do, in my opinion, is react to the interface and have a sense for is this a clean, well-lighted place, or is this a dark, back alley? Does this feel professional? Does this feel like what I expected? Is it very crowded or is there a use of negative space and openness, such that my eye is drawn to one thing more than another? All of these visual design cues, that we all know work, people process very quickly and then use to form judgments about the integrity of the organization, the credibility of the organization that they?’re interacting with. And what this research showed was that the snap judgments that people formed about those sites, based on that very thin level of information, impacted their willingness to transact with that organization on down the line.

BILL: Yeah, very interesting. Very straightforward but often overlooked, isn?’t it?

LANCE: Oh, very often, yeah.

BILL: It?’s amazing. You also mentioned shopping carts, obviously a topic for e-commerce sites. Anybody selling anything on the Web today has to use in some cases a templated, canned shopping cart environment. Your experience has been that?’s been some challenge or has challenges for those that are buying, right, statistically?

LANCE: It certainly can. Most carts can stand to have some level of improvement to the interface that would ultimately improve the cart through-put rate, or reduce the cart abandonment rate. So we?’ve engaged in some work where we?’ve not been able to touch the fields or deal with raw flow, but we?’ve just been able to upgrade the interface itself, and we?’ve been able to drop cart abandonment by 20 points, without changing design.

BILL: That?’s significant. And just a couple of elements too, right?

LANCE: Relatively straight-forward stuff, as you said.

BILL: Great. Very interesting. Today?’s WOW Technology Minute is brought to you by Webprotraining.org. Webprotraining.org offers a complete solution for all of your Web Professional training needs including WOW certification options. Check it out at webprotraining.org.

Adobe Tips and Tricks-Interview with Michael Ninness, Adobe Systems Inc.

Greetings WOW members and Web professionals everywhere. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute.

Today?’s podcast is a continuation of the media coverage of the Web Design World Conference in Seattle, WA. I had the pleasure to meet up with and interview Michael Ninness, Senior Product Manager for InDesign at Adobe Systems Inc. Michael always draws a crowd and his presentations are nothing short of amazing!

In his two sessions, Pixel Perfect: Essential Image Enhancement for Web and Flash Designers and Trends in Digital Publishing Michael packed a punch with a variety tips and insights on all manner of graphics-related topics ranging from:

•Importing layered PSD files into Flash CS3
•How to Control Flash?’s optimization settings for embedded bitmaps
•How to load external JPEGS, PNGs and GIFs into a SWF file at runtime
•Instant color cast removal
•How to remove or reduce dreaded digital noise
•Photoshop secrets
•Resolving color conflicts between Photoshop and Flash and much more

Check out the four minute interview on the WOW Technology Minute website with Michael where he provides a few tips for the subscribers of this podcast. Look for podcast additional interviews with a host of other notable speakers including representatives from Yahoo and much more.

Today?’s WOW Technology Minute is brought to you by WebProtraining.org, offering a complete solution for all your Web professional training needs including WOW certification options. Check it out at
Web Professional Training

Transcript of Michael Ninness
Length – 4:09

BILL CULLIFER: We?’re here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute, here at the Web Design World Seattle Conference where WOW is a media sponsor. I have the pleasure to be interviewing Michael Ninness from Adobe, specifically representing Product Manager for InDesign. You presented twice here today Michael, great sessions, they were jam-packed. Can you give us a summary of those sessions?

MICHAEL NINNESS: Sure.

BILL: And can you also provide us with a walk-away, something that our listeners…? Yeah, that would be great.

MICHAEL NINNESS: Yeah, so we did two sessions today. One of them was called “Pixel Perfect” which was just as many tips as I could cram in an hour on how to get your images looking the best they could with Flash Web design. So lots of practical imaging tips. The second session at the end of the day was “Transit Digital Publishing.” We took a look at what?’s going on in the world of digital magazines and digital publications online, how the Internet is kind of changing traditional print models and how they?’re complementary to each other. At the end of that session I did a technology sneak peek of what a future version of InDesign at Flash might do to make the handoff of working with InDesign and Flash together.

BILL: Going to be announcing Macs maybe, in San Francisco?

MICHAEL: The technology preview means that it may or may not show up in a future product.

BILL: Fair enough.

MICHAEL: This is our chance to kind of give a sneak peek at what we‘re thinking. Today if you wanted to go from InDesign to Flash there?’s really no handoff story other than to export a JPEG out of your print layout. So we?’re trying to imagine now that these two companies are together, could there be a better handoff strategy or workflow between InDesign and Flash?

BILL: Totally. So it?’s all about workflow and all about making it easier for communication between the designer and developer.

MICHAEL: Well it?’s also enabling the traditional print designers [inaudible].

BILL: Fair enough. Yeah, sure.

MICHAEL: They live in a world that seems like A, if not A resolution than they?’ve got to learn animation and action script and interact activities, so this is kind of a bridge to get them to kind of play along with their Flash brothers and sisters.

BILL: Yeah, totally.

MICHAEL: I?’ll give you a couple of tips from the “Pixel Perfect“ session today two that kind of stood out and made people go, “Wow, I wish I?’d known that a long time ago.” First one is there is no such thing as resolution on the Web. It doesn?’t matter if it?’s 1,000 dpi or 72 dpi. What matters is how many pixels across and how many pixels down . So a lot of people were going, “Really? No. I?’ve always heard it was 72 dpi for the Web, right?”

BILL: Interesting.

MICHAEL: It?’s like, no, it makes no difference. It?’s how many pixels across and how many pixels down. The resolution can be anything you want. So resolution only matters when you print.

BILL: Huh, interesting.

MICHAEL: Second tip is that there?’s a way in Photoshop to do two different levels of compression in the same JPEG. So you might have an image where there?’s a portrait of two people in the foreground, let?’s say, and you don‘t want their faces to get all JPEG-y and artifact, but you don?’t really care so much about the background. So to do that you?’d go to the channels panel in Photoshop and you would paint out a little mask of their faces, that‘s the area you want to protect. Then you go to the web dialer box and file, save for web, and next to the quality wheel, there?’s a little tiny button that a lot of people miss. If you click that it takes you to a secret dialing box where you can actually control–

BILL: Ah! Terrific.

MICHAEL: …two different levels of compressions. There?’s a black slider and a white slider. The white slider represents the areas that you painted in that channel before. The black area stands for everything else. You can set two compression values for each area.

BILL: I appreciate that. Two great tips.

MICHAEL: Bonus tips.

BILL: Yeah, bonus tips.

MICHAEL: You have a text layer. You don?’t even have to do the alpha channel, you go into save for the Web and you have your text layers in your document, you click that little secret button there, there?’s a little checkbox that says “automatically create a mask off your text layers.” So why is that important? So you see text against an image, typically when you save images as JPEGs the text looks all mangled. This lets you have your text in nice and crisp against the photographic background.

BILL: Nice! Three excellent, great things. Michael, certainly appreciate it, all the stuff that you do for the organization, all the things that you do for the profession. We certainly appreciate it. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) Michael Ninness at the Web Design World Seattle Conference. And a nice shirt too to boot, Michael.

MICHAEL: Thank you.

BILL: Thank you so much for your time today.

MICHAEL: Bye.

Web 2.0: The Power-Behind the Hype-Interview with Jared Spool, User Interface Engineer

Greetings WOW members and Web professionals everywhere. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute.

Today?’s podcast is a continuation of the media coverage of the Web Design World Conference in Seattle, WA. I had the pleasure to interview Jared Spool, User Interface Engineer at User Interface Engineering. Jared presented on the topic of Web 2.0: The Power-Behind the Hype where he explained the four elements of Web 2.0 complete with the benefits and the potential challenges and pitfalls to be aware of as well.

Check out the four minute interview on the WOW Technology Minute website.

Look for podcast interviews with a host of other notable speakers in the near future including representatives from Adobe, Microsoft, Yahoo and much more.

Today s podcast is sponsored by the Webmaster Survival Guide. Check out all of the great resources and links on the WebmasterSurvivalGuide website.

Transcript of The Power Behind the Jared Spool

BILL CULLIFER: Greetings WOW members and Web Professionals everywhere. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute, here at Web Design World Seattle at the WOW table top,. With Jared Spool, user interface engineer at User Interface Engineering. The organization?’s been around for a number of years. Jared?’s a practicing professional, he?’s been doing this for a number of years and an expert at a wide variety of topics including the session he provided this morning on the topic of Web 2.0. Good morning Jared and thanks for agreeing to this interview.

JARED SPOOL: Good morning.

BILL: Jared, you had talked about Web 2.0, the benefits of the four components and some of the potential pitfalls of Web 2.0. Can you summarize that session for the listeners and the viewers of this podcast?

JARED: Right. So I talked about, well gee I only took an hour before but I?’ll try and do it shorter, I talked about basically, we consider Web 2.0 to basically be four things– APIs, RSS feeds, tagging, also known as folksonomies, and social networks. And when you combine these four things in interesting ways you get what people would consider to be a Web 2.0 design. And so for example, Flickr has social networks, you have contacts, it has tagging — you can tag pictures and you can find pictures based on the tags that you?’ve created and other people have created –it has an RSS feed for every possible thing that you?’d want to get off of the site, they have a feed for it so you can get it, you don?’t have to go to Flickr to see your pictures or see your friend?’s pictures you can go someplace else, and they have APIs so that developers can create things that actually take advantage of it. For example the folks at MOO added an entire printing capability to Flickr that is new and novel. And the Flickr people probably would have never thought it was a big enough business to justify their resources. But MOO has made an entire business out of that.

BILL: Interesting. And you referred to a couple of pitfalls. I mentioned earlier, for example, the interest I have in the areas of pitfalls of Web 2.0 is that many of the webmasters that I represent, the Web professionals, the subscribers of this podcast, represent business and industry, education, and they have to explain or justify Web 2.0 to their management. Can you address that potential issue?

JARED: Yeah. One of the problems with Web 2.0 is that people ask for it without knowing what they?’re asking for. So that is a key element. They think they?’re asking for wikis and blogs and those are things that were built out of Web 2.0 components, but it?’s the components that they?’re really asking for. So you have to sort of deconstruct and say, “What?’s going to make sense in our application, in our needs?” What you really want to be doing is looking at the experience that you want the user to have, to actually be mapping out what is it that you want users to be able to do that they can?’t do today? Such as be able to find a particular thing on your website because other people have found it first so that?’s what you use tagging for. Maybe they want to know that you?’ve added new stuff to the site, so that?’s what you use RSS feeds for. Maybe they want to be able to manipulate the things on your site, so that?’s what you use APIs for. So what is it that you want, the experience that you?’re looking for? And then you figure out, just like with everything else, what components are going to be the essential components to add into that to make it work.

BILL: Yeah, great. Well said. I?’m curious, you said that you had some free resources available for the world population in terms of your blogs and so forth.

JARED: Yes.

BILL: Can you address that?

JARED: Yes. So on our site, which I?’m desperately hoping is usable, uie.com, we have articles and podcasts ourselves and we have a slew of blog posts and all sorts of things, not just talking about Web 2.0 stuff but anything to do with user experiences and designing for user experiences.

BILL: Excellent. Well thank you so much for that. Great resources Jared and great session by the way. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW), the WOW Technology Minute on site here at Web Design World Seattle at the WOW table with Jared Spool, principal from UIE.com. Thank you so much for your time today Jared.

JARED: You?’re welcome.

Shepherding Passionate Communities-Interview with Heather Champ, Flickr

Greetings WOW members and Web professionals everywhere. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute.

I?’m in Seattle, WA participating in the Web Design World Conference representing the WOW as an exhibitor and media sponsor. The promoters of the event lined up a number of terrific speakers for today presenting on a wide variety of Web design and Web development topics. For example, today?’s lineup of speakers included:

•Heather Champ, Community Manager at Flickr
•Jared Spool, Founding Principal User Interface Engineering
•DL Byron, Principal Textura Design
•Michael Ninness, Senior Product Manager Adobe
•Steve Mulder, Director of Emerging Interactions, Molecular
•Dan Rubin, Founder and Principal Webgraph

For today?’s podcast, I had the pleasure to interview Heather Champ, Community Manager from Flickr. As most of you already know, Flickr is the online photo sharing website with hundreds of thousands of members worldwide. Flickr also recently announced a ninety-second video sharing service as well.

In her keynote address entitled “Shepherding Communities” Heather shared her experiences and I?’ve outlined the complete list below. I?’ve also posted a three minute video of Heather on the WOW Technology Minute website.

If you?’ve thinking of establishing a community for yourself or for your clients, you owe it to yourself to pay close attention to following recommendations and today’s interview:

•First, establish a community guidelines
•You?’ll need to have some thick skin
•Create the tools for self management of your members
•Communicate
•Own it
•Don?’t wait (stick to your announcements)
•Avoid creating super villains
•User generated discontent (losing site of your members)
•Make Lemonade (making the best of a bad situation)
•Change is hard (the first 48 is the toughest)
•Embrace the chaos

Look for interviews with a host of other notable speakers in future podcast. Tomorrows podcast will feature an interview with Jared Spool, Principal User Interface Engineering on the topic Wen 2.0: The Power Behind the Hype.

Today?’s sponsor of the WOW Technology Minute is sponsored by Concentric offering small business and shared web hosting solutions.

Register for the FREE WEBINAR: Combating Spam! Wednesday, 7/30 @ 10:00am PST where will be discussing “Perimeter Email Protection” as an email security solution that can protect your business from spam, viruses, directory harvesting.

To register for this FREE one hour Webinar contact: robert(AT)joinwow.org

Transcript of Shepherding Passionate Communities – Heather Champ

BILL CULLIFER: Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute here at the Web Design World Seattle Conference. I have the pleasure to be interviewing Heather Champ, Director of Community at Flickr. Heather, good evening and thank you for agreeing to this interview.

HEATHER CHANT: Oh, it?’s my pleasure.

BILL: Heather, you were the keynote presenter today on building communities. Can you expand on that and give us a summary, to the subscribers of this podcast, what that keynote was all about?

HEATHER: What I wanted to share was things that we?’ve learned. So we have a very large and passionate community of people who are uploading their content and even we?’ve been surprised in terms of how people use Flickr, sort of what the activities are, what the behaviors are. And I guess the one thing I?’d like to talk about is one of the slides I had was “Make Lemonade.” I think there?’s an incredible opportunity. There are going to be times when things go wrong, so I like to think of when the universe hands you lemons, make lemonade.

A couple of years ago we were going to have to take the site down. Typically when we do that we like to put a banner up top where we can say how long the downtime is going to be. On this day my Director of Operations came up and was like, “We need to take it down.” I?’m like, “We?’ll do the banner.” He was like, “No, you don?’t understand. Now.” So what we did was we switched out our usual Flickr visage and we put up a coloring contest. We had a black and white image of the Flickr dots with nothing in them and asked people to print out the page and tag it a certain, like do something with it and then tag it with “flickr coloring contest” so when the site would come back up we?’d pick one and give them a year of Pro. We had over 2500 people participate and the images were just so awesome that we gave away 14 Pro accounts. And everybody who participated we gave three months of Pro free. In the end unexpected downtime is really a no-win situation, but in this event we really kind of turned it into something that was really wonderful and people had a good time.

BILL: Yeah, fantastic. I love that example. And also I?’m curious to know, did you go into this business model thinking that this community would be as active, as pro-active, as they are?

HEATHER: Well, I think Flickr is kind of like the frog in the warm water in some ways. The community has grown up around us and it was, when I first joined back in 2005 there were 17 million photos. Now we?’ve got 2.6 billion photos. So it?’s kind of come up around us. If you told me three years ago, “You?’re going to be managing a community of 2.6 billion photos,” I?’d be like, “No way, I can?’t deal with that.” But I think we?’ve grown and we?’ve learned as the community has grown and learned. So I think it?’s really what you make of it and the opportunities that come to you.

BILL: And you?’re embracing the chaos.

HEATHER: I love it. I absolutely do.

BILL: You?’re making the best of it. So I understand that you also started offering video just recently. How long has that been?

HEATHER: April 8, 2008. We now, Flickr supports video up to 90 seconds playback and it?’s really awesome. There have been some incredible videos from around the world that people share.

BILL: I bet. And we can check it out at www.flickr.com.

HEATHER: Absolutely. Thank you.

BILL: Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters. Thanks for your time Heather.

HEATHER: Thank you so much.

BILL: Today?’s WOW Technology Minute is sponsored by Concentric offering small business and shared web hosting solutions. Register for the free webinar “Combating Spam” Wednesday, July 30th at 10am Pacific Standard Time. We?’ll be discussing premier email protection as an email security solution that can protect your business from spam, viruses, directory harvesting. To register for this free one-hour webinar contact Robert at joinwow.org.

Building Findable Websites-Interview with Aaron Walter, Author, Web Designer and Educator

Greetings WOW members and Web professionals everywhere. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute. Today?’s podcast is a continuation of the media coverage of the Voices That Matter Web Design Conference that took place in Nashville last month.

For today?’s podcast, I have the pleasure to be interviewing Aaron Walter, Author, Web Designer and Educator from Atlanta, Georgia. Aaron is the author of Building Findable Websites: Web Standards SEO. I met up with Aaron to talk about his session and to ask him to summarize the session complete with some great website findability resources that you can start using today.

Check out the three minute podcast interview with Aaron Walter on the WOW Technology Minute website.

Today’s WOW Technology Minute is sponsored by the Web 2.0 Expo New York taking place September 16 – 19, 2008 at the Javits Center
New York, NY.

From start-ups to enterprises, the Web 2.0 Expo New York is the event for the designers, developers, entrepreneurs, VCs, marketing professionals, product managers and business strategists building businesses on the web.

Seven conference tracks, a vibrant expo hall and plenty of networking events cover business strategy, web design, user experience, SEM, tagging, developer hacks, community building, AJAX, Ruby, web operations, user-generated content, and more.

Check out all of the great links including a discount code for WOW members on the WOW Technology Minute website.

Register today at Web 2 Expo website and use code webny08bm6 to receive 20% off your full conference pass.

Transcript of Aaron Walter Interview

BILL CULLIFER: Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute at the Voices That Matter Conference here in Nashville. I have the pleasure to be introducing and interviewing Aaron Walter. Aaron is a specialist in usability and he?’s also a faculty member at the Art Institute of Atlanta. Good morning Aaron and thanks for agreeing to this interview.

AARON WALTER: Good morning.

BILL: Aaron, you presented on Findability – Design Comp to Code. Can you summarize that session for the listeners of this podcast?

AARON: Sure. The idea with this is we?’re talking about findability which is, I wrote a book called BUILDING FINDABLE WEBSITES, and the idea is looking at our craft in a holistic way, thinking about how we build our messages and how we connect that with an audience. And that is search engine optimization, social networking and all sorts of different strategies as we?’re building a site. This particular session was about how to use visual design principles. So findability is not just about SEO stuff, but also I would say that designers have the power to do jedi mind tricks on users, where they can say, “I want you to look over here at this thing. I want you to perform this action.” So the idea was we were looking at basic principles of design, talking about contrast. Are we using color, scale, position, texture, and various other design techniques to direct users?’ attention to key elements on the page that relate to business objectives? And then we looked at a case study of a project that sort of embodied all of those different techniques.

BILL: Excellent. And you have resources that lend itself to this topic, is that also correct?

AARON: Yeah. Well I have, there are a lot of resources actually on my book?’s website Building Findable Websites.com In fact when I was writing my book I wrote way too much and there?’s about 120 pages, five chapters, free that are there.

BILL: Wow. Terrific.

AARON: And I will be publishing a findability checklist pretty soon and it?’s just best practices. When you?’re working on a new site or you?’re redesigning a website, what are the things I need to keep in mind that I can do to make it more findable to my audience? And then it has references to where you can find the technical details of how to pull something off, has references to the chapters in the book.

BILL: Excellent. Sounds like a great resource. And where can we find that again?

AARON: It?’s www.buildingfindablewebsites.com.

BILL: Excellent. Well, we certainly appreciate the time. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW), the WOW Technology Minute at the Voices That Matter Conference. Thanks again Aaron.

AARON: Thank you.

How to improve Each and Every Page on Your Site-Interview with Robert Hoekman, Jr.

Greetings WOW members and Web professionals everywhere. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute.

Today?’s podcast is a continuation of the media coverage of the Voices That Matter Web Design Conference that took place in Nashville last month.

For today?’s podcast, I have the pleasure to be interviewing Robert Hoekman, Jr. Founder of the Web design and strategy company Miskeeto. Robert us also an author of two titles for Web designer published by the New Riders organization.

I caught up with Robert an requested that he summarize his session: “How to improve Each and Every Page on Your Site.” Robert reveals a couple of his design test and principles that you can start using today. Check out the seven minute podcast interview with Robert Hoekman, Jr. on the WOW Technology Minute website.

Check out Robert’s websites at: Miskeeto.com and his Blog

Today?’s WOW Technology Minute is brought to you by WebProtraining.org, offering a complete solution for all your Web professional training needs including WOW certification options. Check it out at Web Professional Training.

Transcript of Robert Hoekman Interview

BILL CULLIFER: Greetings WOW members and Web Professionals everywhere. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute. Today?’s podcast is a continuation of the media coverage of the Voices That Matter Web Design Conference that took place in Nashville last month. For today?’s podcast I have the pleasure to be interviewing Robert Hoekman, founder of the Web design and strategy company, Miskeeto. Robert is also an author of two best selling titles for Web designers, published by the New Riders organization.

Robert, you presented on the topic of “How to Improve Each and Every Webpage on Your Website.” Can you summarize the session and can you also provide the subscribers of this podcast with a couple of walk-aways that they can use today?

ROBERT HOEKMAN: Definitely. Well, I came up with that incredibly catchy title hoping that it would fill the room.

BILL: I agree, it?’s a catchy title.

ROBERT: It seems to have worked, so success there. But basically the presentation was mostly about pretty much the same points that are in my first book, DESIGNING THE OBVIOUS. It covers those same seven guiding design concepts, principles, guiding web application design principles. Sort of over-arcing stuff like “build only what?’s absolutely necessary” and “make sure to refine each one of the interactions and reduce it to its absolute essentials.” But really, I think the thing that was interesting, I think the major take-away for that session was that the design principles themselves are actually the result of…they?’re sort of born out of human psychology. So during the presentation I presented stories where I tried to reveal a certain aspect of human psychology and how people actually think and act and then extrapolate a design principle from that, and then show an example of where that design principle has been applied in a real site and how it helped.

So one example of that, there was a cheeseburger story, this is actually the first story I told in the session, there was a fast-food chain that went out at one point and had done all this market research to determine whether or not their customers would buy a low-carb version of their best-selling cheeseburger. And through their market research they managed to determine that “Yes, our customers would in fact buy a low–carb version of a cheeseburger.” So they went back and set their steps into action and sent their marketing department into action and they rolled out this huge campaign and put it out on the menu and there were commercials and billboards and all that stuff. And within just a few weeks of them launching this new product they ended up having to take it back off the menu and scrap it entirely. And it was because basically, the researchers went out and asked a whole bunch of hypothetical questions and what they found, or what they didn?’t find, what they discovered later was that people will answer hypothetical questions with hypothetical answers. People are very, very bad at predicting how they?’re going to act in a particular situation or how they?’re going to think about a particular situation. And so the design principle to extrapolate from that is to understand your users, but then to ignore them. Basically you want to be able to read between the lines of what they actually mean and not what they say that they mean, not what they say what they want.

BILL: Yeah. That?’s fascinating. And I know that you cover a lot of these principles in your book that?’s been out for some time?

ROBERT: That?’s true, yeah. All of the points that I talked about during the session are covered in much more depth in the book DESIGNING THE OBVIOUS, which has been out I think about getting close to two years.

BILL: Two years. You know it?’s really amazing that we take a lot for granted being in the Web design space and it?’s obvious that giving it some thought and understanding your clients?’ needs and understanding the user audience is a very important thing. But at the same time, as you said, reading between the lines and giving some analysis I suppose, to their responses, is really in effect what you?’re saying, right?

ROBERT: Yeah, definitely. There are far, far too many companies and applications that I?’ve seen and websites that I?’ve seen where developers are, they?’re doing a very, very good job of listening to the customers, but they?’re listening to them in a very, very literal way. So a customer says, “Well here?’s a problem that I have every single day and if you just added this button here I wouldn?’t have this problem anymore.” But then the developers go into action and they say, “Okay, we?’ll add this button here and this button will do XYZ.” And they end up pretty much putting a Band-Aid on a problem instead of actually solving the problem. So they?’ve come up with a solution based on what the end-user said what was the problem.

BILL: Right.

ROBERT: But they didn?’t actually analyze it to figure out what the real problem was, that this button was missing, maybe it was that the task flow was all wrong in the first place.

BILL: Interesting.

ROBERT: And that if the feature was designed differently this would have been a mute point.

BILL: Yeah, very insightful. I appreciate that and I look forward to getting a link up on the book. I?’m assuming that Peach Pit and Amazon still offers the book. Can we reach out and get the book there?

ROBERT: Oh yeah, definitely. It?’s still actually selling very, very well, which is great news. I?’m very happy about that. It continues to get very good reviews. I actually have a newer book out, in fact, called DESIGNING THE MOMENT, which is, I don?’t want to call it “Designing the Obvious Part Two” but it is very much built on top of DESIGNING THE OBVIOUS. So it kind of follows what DESIGNING THE OBVIOUS was. Where as the first book was kind of about these seven main guiding principles of web application design, DESIGNING THE MOMENT, the second book, is about much, much more specific design principles. So it?’s a collection of 31 stories from actual design projects that I have worked on or have worked on with other people. And basically each chapter is done in a story-telling format where I tell the story, I say, “Okay, here?’s what the situation was. Here?’s the problem we were faced with. Here were the constraints.”

BILL: Interesting.

ROBERT: “Here?’s how I started the design. And then I didn?’t like this and here?’s why.” And so I basically walk through all the justifications that I made for arriving at the design solution that I chose. And then within each chapter I tried to touch on one specific principle that I used to kind of solve that design problem. So it very much builds on the first book.

BILL: Some real-life examples from the trenches.

ROBERT: Right, exactly. They?’re all from real projects. In fact, I didn?’t really think about that all that much when I was writing the book but then when the book came out I got all nervous all of a sudden. I thought, wow, this is kind of almost a journal of these little bits of design that I?’ve done over the past couple of years. And suddenly I got very nervous. I was like, wow, if this gets bad reviews it?’s like, personal.

BILL: Yeah, well I know everybody at the Pearson organization speaks highly of you so I look forward to taking a look at the book and learning more. And we certainly appreciate your time, Robert, today. Obviously you?’re a very accomplished person and we appreciate your perspective on this very important topic. And we look forward to future interviews and maybe peeling back the layer of the onion on some of those 30 principles and examples that you?’ve learned. We certainly appreciate your time today. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW), the WOW Technology Minute, on the phone with Robert Hoekman interaction designer and usability specialist at Miskeeto. Thanks for your time today Robert.

ROBERT: Thank you.

Microformats-Interview with Jinny Potter, University of Georgia

Greetings WOW members and Web professionals everywhere. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute.

Today?’s podcast is a continuation of the media coverage of the Voices That Matter Web Design Conference that took place in Nashville last month.

For today?’s podcast, I have the pleasure to be interviewing Jinny Potter, Technical Lead of Web Development at the University of Georgia. I asked Jinny to summarize Jeremy Keith?’s session on Microformats: What are they and why do I care and to share her perspective on the value proposition. Check out the three minute podcast interview with Jinny Potter on the WOW Technology Minute website.

Jeremy Keith is a notable author and Web Developer living in the U.K. Check out Jeremy’s website.

Today’s sponsor of the WOW Technology Minute is Web Design World Seattle. Web Design World Seattle is an incredible opportunity to gain insight and interact with some of the hottest designers / developers in the web industry. Every session has been updated for 2008, and most sessions are brand new.

Learn the latest technologies including Ajax, CSS, JavaScript, as well as rich interface design. usability, e-commerce design, and search engine optimization . Mashups, blogs, social networking will be discussed in depth and a full-day workshop features Adobe Photoshop, Flash, and Dreamweaver.

Visit Web Design World Seattle to register.

Enter the code WDW08 and receive $150.00 off the registration fee. An exclusive offer for WOW members.

A full transcript of this podcast will be available in twenty four hours.

Tagging-Interview with Gene Smith, Principal with nForms.ca

Greetings WOW members and Web professionals everywhere. Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) and the WOW Technology Minute.

Today?’s podcast is a continuation of the media coverage of the Voices That Matter Web Design Conference that took place in Nashville early last month.

For today?’s podcast, I have the pleasure to be interviewing Gene Smith, Principal at nForm.ca. Gene is the author of the book “Tagging”: People-powered Metadata for the Social Web.

I asked Gene to summarize his session on the topic of Tagging and to share his perspective on the value proposition and the differentiation from the Semantic Web. Check out the five minute interview with Gene Smith on the WOW Technology Minute website.

Gene?’s book links and a summary of the business value.

Today?’s sponsor of the WOW Technology Minute is sponsored by Concentric offering small business and shared web hosting solutions.

Register for the FREE WEBINAR: Combating Spam! Wednesday, 7/30 @ 10:00am PST where will be discussing “Perimeter Email Protection” as an email security solution that can protect your business from spam, viruses, directory harvesting.

To register for this FREE one hour Webinar contact: robert(AT)joinwow.org

Transcript of Tagging with Gene Smith

BILL CULLIFER: Bill Cullifer here with the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW), and the WOW Technology Minute here at the Voices That Matter Conference in Nashville, 2008. I have the pleasure to be interviewing and introducing Gene Smith, the principal for nForm User Experiences, a user-experience consultant, speaking here at the conference on tagging. And you?’ve recently published a book–

GENE SMITH: That?’s right.

BILL: On the topic of tagging. Gene, for the listeners of this podcast, those generalists, webmasters, designers, developers, Web professionals, if you will, within the WOW community listening and viewing this podcast, can you summarize the value proposition from a tagging perspective and summarize your session today?

GENE: Sure. So for people who manage websites tagging is a really important way for people to be able to find your material again, your content, find their way back to your stuff when they come across it online. There?’s lots of different ways they can do that. A popular social-bookmarking site is called del.icio.us. You can go to www.delicious.com for more about that. When people see the link in delicious.com they can add some keywords to it, those keywords are tags and tags help people explore del.icio.us, look at things that are popular and understand what other people are finding and learning about. So for webmasters I think the most important thing is to make it easy for people to bookmark your stuff. Lots of people have a little link they embed on their site they call “save on del.icio.us” or “save on StumbleUpon” or other sites that let people save and share links and tag on. And that?’s a great way to start. Basically the value proposition of tagging is helping people find you, find your information.

BILL: I appreciate that. You made a comment about the differentiation between tagging and Semantic Web. Can you address that? The webmasters of the world, they?’ve heard Semantic Web, they generally understand it, they?’ve heard individuals like Tim Berners Lee, who obviously is leading the pack on Semantic Web, can you address that? What is your perspective on that topic?

GENE: Well, I?’m really interested in what works for people. So I?’m less interested in philosophically what the Semantic Web is, or philosophically what Web 2.0 is. I?’m interested in what helps people find things more easily, what helps companies or businesses get their content out there in a more successful way. So typically the Web 2.0 tagging world is a very bottom-up, user-generated, user-driven world where people are contributing videos or adding photos or tagging links or other things. The Semantic Web world is a little bit more top-down structure, people building ontologies and knowledge from works and organizing knowledge through those. What I talked about in my session today was a lot about how people are mixing up those methods to do new things, to find ways to help users keep track of their information more effectively, help them navigate a website in a little bit better way, help a company build a navigation system that actually scales without needing tweaking every day. So the people I really look to are, I look a little bit to the academic research, but really to entrepreneurs, start-ups, software companies who are trying to solve real problems using these technologies. They?’re doing the innovative stuff and they don?’t care about philosophically what the Semantic Web is or what Web 2.0 is. What they care about is what works. And so that?’s the kind of stuff I talked about in my session today and that?’s the kind of stuff I find inspiring.

BILL: Fair enough. Thank you for that response. Gene, a little bit about the book, it?’s called TAGGING.

GENE: That?’s right.

BILL: And it?’s available from Pearson Publishing.

GENE: Yeah.

BILL: And any other location where they might be able to find that?

GENE: Absolutely. Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, if you?’re in Canada, Chapters.ca or Indigo.ca, and probably any other online bookstore around the world would be able to get it for you.

BILL: Excellent.

GENE: And the great thing about it is if you just go and search on Amazon for “tagging”, it?’ll be the first result.

BILL: Terrific. Great. Thank you so much Gene for your time.

GENE: Thanks Bill.

BILL: Bill Cullifer here for the World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) at the Voices That Matter Conference. Thanks for your time Gene.

GENE: Great, thank you.

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